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Robbery

Stealing another person’s property to obtain or to use it with intent to either temporarily or permanently deprive the other person of the property typically qualifies as a theft offense. However, if an alleged offender directly takes money or any other property from another person, then the crime can be considered a robbery.

This criminal offense has different grades of severity, but it is generally a more serious charge than theft or even burglary. Because these cases involve harm against alleged victims, prosecutors will often seek harsh prison sentences and very heavy fines.

St. Petersburg Robbery Lawyer

If you were arrested in Florida for allegedly taking money or some other kind of property from another person with the use or threat of force, it is critical that you seek legal counsel as soon as possible. Melinda Morris is a former State Attorney’s Office felony prosecutor who knows what types of evidence to seek out in investigating these types of case.

Our Pinellas County robbery attorneys at Morris Law Firm, P.A. fight to get charges reduced or dismissed for clients in Pasco County, Sarasota County, Manatee County, and Hillsborough County. Call (727) 388-4736 to set up a free, confidential consultation that will allow our firm to review your case and discuss your legal options.


Florida Robbery Information Center


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Types of Robbery Offenses in Pinellas County

Florida Statute § 812.13 defines this crime as an alleged offender taking money or some other kind of property which may be the subject of larceny from another person with the use of force, violence, assault, or putting in fear and the intent to either permanently or temporarily deprive the person or the owner of the money or other property. These types of criminal offenses have various names and degrees of severity.

Crimes under this statute include:

  • Armed Robbery — This term describes a crime committed by an alleged offender who carried a firearm or weapon during the commission of the alleged offense. It is classified as a first-degree felony.
  • Strong-Arm Robbery — This term describes a crime committed by an alleged offender who did not carry a firearm or weapon during the commission of the alleged offense. It is classified as a second-degree felony.

There are also two other criminal offenses listed in this chapter that also carry serious consequences. These include:

  • Home-Invasion Robbery, Florida Statute § 812.135 — This term describes any robbery that occurs when an alleged offender enters a dwelling with the intent to commit a robbery and does commit a robbery of the occupants therein. It is classified as a first-degree felony, regardless of whether the alleged offender was carrying a firearm or weapon during the commission of the alleged offense, although a firearm or other deadly weapon does increase the maximum possible sentence.
  • Robbery by sudden snatching, Florida Statute § 812.131 — This term describes the taking of money or other property from the alleged victim’s person with the intent to permanently or temporarily deprive him or her of the money or other property and when, in the course of the taking, the alleged victim was or became aware of the taking. This crime does not need to involve any amount of additional force by the alleged offender, any resistance by the alleged victim, or any injury to the victim’s person. If the alleged offender carried a firearm or other deadly weapon during the commission of this crime, it is classified as a second-degree felony, but it is a third-degree felony if the alleged offender was not carrying a deadly weapon or firearm.

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Robbery Penalties in Florida

Alleged offenders charged with any variation of this crime are likely facing some very stiff consequences if convicted. Generally, the statutory maximum sentences are determined by the grade of the criminal offense.

This usually means that a person convicted of robbery could face on of the following sentences, depending on the specific alleged offense:

  • Third-Degree Felony — Up to five years in prison and/or fine of up to $5,000.
  • Second-Degree Felony — Up to 15 years in prison and/or fine of up to $10,000.
  • First-Degree Felony — Up to 30 years in prison and/or fine of up to $10,000.

However, it is important to understand that the Florida Statutes for specific offenses allow for possible life imprisonment for certain first-degree felony offenses. An alleged offender could be sentenced to life in prison if he or she is convicted of carrying a firearm or other deadly weapon during the commission of either robbery or home invasion robbery.


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10-20-Life Enhancements for Pinellas County Robbery Crimes

While the maximum possible sentences allow alleged offenders to know what the “worst-case scenarios” might be for their cases, it is also critical to remember that certain types of these crimes involving guns may be eligible for harsh mandatory minimum sentences under Florida’s “10-20-Life” law. Under Florida Statute § 775.087, a person could face the following punishments if any of the following applies to the commission of the robbery or home invasion robbery offense for which he or she is convicted:

  • At least three years in prison if the alleged offender possessed a firearm;
  • At least 10 years in prison if the alleged offender pulled out or brandished a firearm;
  • At least 20 years in prison if the alleged offender discharged the firearm; or
  • At least 25 years up to life in prison if alleged offender shoots another person with firearm, regardless of whether that person is injured or killed.

Alleged offenders who have been previously convicted of felony offenses can also be subject to enhanced sentences if they are considered repeat offenders under Florida Statute § 775.084. People can face extended terms of imprisonment if they are convicted of robbery and designated as habitual violent felony offenders or if they are convicted of robbery or home invasion robbery and are designated as three-time violent felony offenders.


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Find a Robbery Lawyer in St. Petersburg

Are you facing charges of allegedly taking money or some other kind of property from another person? You will want to have skilled legal representation as soon as possible.

Morris Law Firm, P.A. represents clients in Tampa, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, and many surrounding communities. Our Pinellas County robbery attorneys will provide a thorough review of your case when you call (727) 388-4736 today to schedule a free consultation.

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